Marsvin

Guinea Pigs

Guinea Pigs

Cavia porcellus (tama) Today, it is one of our most common companion animal species. The domestic form is a domesticated variant of hybrids after three wild guinea pig species, including Cavia aperea. Guinea pig breeds are distinguished by different fur types, including smooth-haired, Abyssinian, teddy, and sheltie. A guinea pig is sexually mature at 4-5 weeks of age.

Belongs to: Order Rodentia (rodents)
Suborder: Hystricomorpha (porcupine-like rodents)
Family: Guinea pigs (Caviidae)
Weight: Adult animal 900 grams - 1 kg
Lifespan: Usually 5-7 years
Gestation period: about 70 days
Offspring: 2-4 offspring, born well-developed with fur and open eyes. The young ones nurse for about 3 weeks.
Marsvin
Kanin

Rabbit

Rabbit

(Oryctolagus cuniculus dom) Domestic rabbits are popular pets and come in a large variety of different breeds. They are domesticated forms of the European wild rabbit. They become sexually mature at 3-4 months of age and have a nursing period of about 6 weeks.

Belongs to: Hares and rabbits (Lagomorpha)
Family: Rabbits (Leporidae)
Weight: 1-10 kg depending on the breed.
Lifespan: Usually 6-8 years.
Gestation period: 30-33 days.
Offspring: The young are born naked and blind, with a birth weight of 30-80 grams. Dwarf breeds rarely have more than 5 offspring, while larger breeds can have over 10 young.
Kanin
Rödräv

Red Fox

Red Fox

(Vulpes vulpes) The red fox is common throughout the country. The population decreased significantly during the 1980s due to sarcoptic mange, but is now increasing again. Otherwise, the red fox has a very extensive distribution throughout the Northern Hemisphere and lives in a variety of habitats. The fox is a predator, but at the same time our country's most versatile "jack-of-all-trades" when it comes to food. A fox eats everything from blueberries and grains, to worms and beetles, to hares, voles, birds and even roe deer. Small rodents are a favorite food. Red foxes can live alone, in pairs or in small groups.

Belongs to: Order Carnivora (carnivores/predators)
Family: Canidae (dogs)
Weight: 6-10 kg (males) and 5-7 kg (females)
Lifespan: Up to 20 years.
Mating season: Occurs during January-March.
Gestation period: Approximately 52-53 days.
Offspring: Born in April-May: usually 3-6 pups, who are born blind.
Rödräv
Fjällräv

Arctic Fox

Arctic Fox

(Alopex lagopus) In our country, the Arctic fox is limited to the high mountain tundra. It has been protected in Sweden since 1928, but the population is still only around 100 individuals. The Arctic fox has a wide distribution across the Arctic region and can be found on tundra, sea ice, and high mountain plateaus. In a single litter, there may be foxes with both white and dark ("blue") winter fur if the parents carry the genes for both color variations. In our country, approximately 1 in 10 Arctic foxes are blue.

Belongs to: Order Carnivora (carnivores/predators)
Family: Canidae (dogs)
Weight: Between 1.5-4 kg on average.
Lifespan: Up to 14 years
Mating season: In March-June.
Gestation period: About 52 days.
The puppies: are born during May - mid-July and there can be between 1-13 in the same litter.
Fjällräv
Järv

Wolverine

Wolverine

(Gulo gulo) In our country, the wolverine lives in the mountains and the forests close to the mountains. The wolverine was placed under protection in 1969 when the population was restricted to the mountains of Norrbotten. Today, the population is estimated to be a few hundred individuals. The wolverine has a circumpolar distribution, meaning it lives in mountain and tundra areas as well as in the northern parts of the taiga (boreal forest) in Europe, Asia, and North America. For most of the year, wolverines live alone in large, extensive home ranges. Wolverines dig a den in the snow. The cubs are born blind and have a white fur. They weigh around 100 grams.

Belongs to: Order Carnivora (carnivores/predators)
Family: Weasels (Mustelidae)
Weight: 20-30 kg (male), 10-20 kg (female).
Lifespan: 15-18 years
Mating season: Occurs during the period from April to August, with a peak in June.
Gestation period: Gestation period is 9-11 months from mating, but wolverines have delayed implantation, so the actual fetal development is about 2 months.
Offspring: They are born in the winter (February-March) in a den, and 2 or 3 cubs are the most common.
Järv

Lynx

Lynx

(Lynx lynx) The lynx has been present in Sweden since the Ice Age. Today, there are probably over 1000 lynx living in Sweden. Lynx can also be found over large parts of the northern hemisphere, distributed among four species: the Iberian lynx (Spain, Portugal), the Canadian lynx (North America), the Eurasian lynx (Europe and Asia), and the bobcat (North America). The tail - with a black tip - and the head - with white ear tufts and a white ruff around the eyes - are distinctive "signal features" on the lynx's body. In addition, the lynx has scent glands on its cheeks and paws, which complement urine marking as a source of scent. An adult lynx eats around 1 kg of meat per day. In our country, hare and roe deer are the most important prey animals, especially during winter.

Belongs to: Order Carnivora (carnivores/predators)
Family: Felines (Felidae)
Weight: 20-35 kg (males), 15-25 kg (females).
Lifespan: Up to 20 years.
Mating season: Occurs during the period from March to April.
Gestation period: 68-70 days
Offspring: They are born in the den in May-June; usually 2, sometimes 3, blind cubs weighing about 0.3 kg at birth.
Lodjur
Utter

Otter

Otter

(Lutra lutra) The otter has declined catastrophically in our country since the 1950s when it was common throughout the country. Today, the otter still exists widely in northern Sweden, as well as in small scattered groups in southern Sweden. The male and female may be together in early spring, otherwise they live alone. The cubs are usually born in May in our country. They weigh about 130 g at birth and are blind for the first two weeks. They are usually 2 in number and nurse for 2 months but stay with the mother for a whole year.

Belongs to: Order Carnivora (carnivores/predators)
Family: Weasels (Mustelidae)
Weight: 8 - 12 kg (male), 6 - 8 kg (female).
Lifespan: 18 - 20 years
Mating season: There are probably two mating seasons - in March-April and also possibly during the summer.
Gestation period: 60 - 63 days. Possibly also delayed fetal development.
Offspring: There are usually 2 kits but can vary between 1 - 5, and they become sexually mature at 2 - 3 years of age.
Utter
Kronhjort

Red Deer

Red Deer

(Cervus elaphus) The red deer has been present in Sweden since the Ice Age. During the 18th and 19th centuries, it was close to extinction in our country. Today, the population is slowly increasing. They mainly live in Skåne. Otherwise, the red deer can be found in southern and central Sweden and occasionally even in the coastal areas of northern Sweden. The adult deer has antlers that normally have three forward-facing points. The top points form a "crown", which has given the red deer its name.

Belongs to: Order Artiodactyla (even-toed ungulates)
Family: Deer family (Cervidae)
Weight: About 250 kg (male), about 120 kg (female).
Lifespan: 30 years
Mating season: September - October
Gestation period: Approximately 235 days
Calves: They are born in May-June, usually only 1 calf but in rare cases 2 calves.
Kronhjort
Myskoxe

Musk Ox

Musk Ox

(Ovibos moschatus) The musk ox is the last of the great prehistoric animals. They lived alongside mammoths and woolly rhinoceroses during the last ice age - even in our country. The mammoths and rhinoceroses have been extinct for a long time, but the musk oxen continue to survive in the harsh and cold tundra areas. The musk oxen died out in Scandinavia 3000 years ago. In the summer of 1971, a handful of musk oxen migrated to Härjedalen from Norway. By the mid-1980s, the number of animals was about 34. The musk oxen's only natural enemy is the wolf. The adult musk oxen form a tight ring (with their horns outward) around the calves as a defense against wolf attacks. The wolves have a very difficult time getting past the "living wall" and taking the calves.

Belongs to: Order Artiodactyla (even-toed ungulates)
Family: Hollow-horned animals (Bovidae)
Weight: Between 225-400 kg. Bulls are significantly heavier than cows.
Lifespan: Around 20 years.
Mating season: July - August
Gestation period: 7 - 9 months
Calves: They are born in April-June the year after mating.
Myskoxe
Ren

Reindeer

Reindeer

(Rangifer tarandus) The reindeer is the only deer species where both the male and female have antlers. The wild reindeer was extinct in our country during the 1800s. "Swedish reindeer" nowadays refer to domesticated reindeer kept by the Sami people. The reindeer is one of the most useful domesticated animals. The Sami name for the male reindeer is "sarv" and for the female "vaja". A castrated male reindeer is called a "härk" and is used as a draft animal. As a living animal, the reindeer is used as a draft and pack animal (pack reindeer) and the females can also be milked. After slaughter, virtually all parts of the reindeer are used. Lichens of various kinds are the reindeer's most important food. Reindeer are specially adapted to digest and utilize the sparse diet. During the summer, their diet is supplemented with grass, herbs, leaves, and mushrooms. In winter, reindeer use their hooves to dig through the snow to find ground lichens. They also eat hanging lichens from trees. Wild reindeer can be found throughout the tundra areas of the northern hemisphere. In North America, they are called Caribou.

Belongs to: Order Artiodactyla (even-toed ungulates)
Family: Deer family (Cervidae)
Weight: 70 - 150 kg (male), 40 - 100 kg (female).
Lifespan: Around 20 years.
Mating season: September - October
Gestation period: 8 months
Calves: They are born in May-June.
Ren